Revista Umělec 2006/3 >> UNAUTHORISED Banksy, Street Art and Private Property Lista de todas las ediciones
UNAUTHORISED  Banksy, Street Art and Private Property
Revista Umělec
Año 2006, 3
6,50 EUR
Enviar la edición impresa:
Suscripción de orden

UNAUTHORISED Banksy, Street Art and Private Property

Revista Umělec 2006/3

01.03.2006

Chris Gill | street and art | en cs de

The following story is part of urban art folklore: a young graffiti artist called Banksy, reportedly Robin Banks from Bristol in South West England, is jeered upon telling his sister that he will one day be an exhibited artist in the Lourve. Fast-forward to today, and Banksy has been exhibited in the Lourve, the Tate Britain, and four of the most prestigious museums in New York City.


This is not your typical fairytale, however. There was no gradual recogni-tion of his life’s work by the art establishment, leading to his work being chosen for these world renowned galleries, as you might expect. Instead, Banksy put on a fake beard, carried his art into the galleries and glued them to the wall. He actually ‘hit‘ the four museums in New York, including the Metropol-itan Museum and Natural History Museum, on the same day in March 2005, leaving a glass-encased beetle with missiles atta-ched to its fighter pilot wings in the latter, which went undetected for several days. Banksy told Reuters, “Obviously th-ey’ve got their eye a lot more on things leaving than things going in, which works in my favor. I imagine they’ll be doing stricter bag checks now.” Banksy thrives on illegal exhibition and mischievous stunts. He exists in the public glare primarily through his graffiti that decorates the walls of many major world cities. The clean lines of stenciling are where he specializes. Black-and-white social commentaries such as two policemen kissing, children hugging bombs or wearing gas masks or the Mona Lisa about to fire a rocket launcher, make the pedestrian look and think about the world around them.


Whether it be the London stencil of a rat painting the words “its not a race” or the series of rats he stenciled in Los Angeles, including one on Melrose Avenue asking “where is Hollywood?” or the dead rat wearing sunglasses he left in the Natural History Museum in April 2004, Banksy’s work has a noticeable recurring vermin theme. He sees his rat militia as a metaphor: “It’s about underground culture, the things that come up from the sewer. I like the idea of nicely tooled up vermin.” Other pieces of animal vandalism include breaking into Bristol Zoo and spraying “Keeper smells – Boring, Boring, Boring” inside Wendy the Elephant’s cage in testament to her 17 years imprisonment, and “We’re bored of fish – We wanna go home” inside the penguin enclosure at London Zoo.


Whilst the body of Banksy’s graffiti are numerous, but isolated visual political statements, the brain are the nine pieces he painted on the Palestinian side of 450 mile long Israeli security fence in the West Bank, in August 2005. Under the duress of having guns pointed at him by the Israeli army, Banksy painted a child sitting at the bottom of a ladder that scales to the top of the fence, the head and feet of a giant white horse, and two white armchairs and a table looking out through a huge window into a colourful mountainous paradise. Banksy condemns the wall, declared illegal by the International Court of Justice, and told the BBC the wall was “the ultimate activity holiday destination for graffiti writers.” The comparison with the use of Berlin wall as an artistic space of the oppressed is obvious.


He also keeps his identity well-guarded, but not to the point of anonymity; as in the age-old graffiti tradition he tags his pieces with the Banksy logo, which is of course stenciled. This is partly through necessity, with his line of work being at odds with global private property laws, and partly through choice; his distaste for the art establishment is demonstrated by the “Mind the Crap” warnings he sprayed on the steps of the Tate Britain on the day of the Turner Prize ceremony in 2001. The ubiquity and accessibility of his work have bestowed him with celebrity status. Some critics say his international profile has led him to hypocritically dip his toes too deeply into the mainstream, to sell-out for commercial success. Its not exactly Bob Dylan going electric, but Banksy’s greatest hits anthology “Wall and Piece” was published in 2005 by Random House, a sub-division of Bertelsmann, the largest book publisher in the world.

Private Property Protection


Bertrand Russell said: “It is preoccupation with possession, more than anything else, that prevents men from living free and nobly.” But for law makers and enforcers, private property legislation is thought necessary to protect the systematic consumption that stimulates economic growth in the wondrous free market miracle. Why invest in real estate if someone is just going to deface it? They dictate where we live, where we can walk and even where we can go to the toilet, as this writer found out recently when a friend was fined Kč 1000 for “pissing on a historical building.“ Individuality is resigned to exist in the spaces left between the dictaats. And it is there, where certain unauthorised art forms blossom into subcultures. From the visual element of this space, emerged graffiti in New York in the 1960s. It subsequently spread across the globe as an art form that symbolically resisted the hegemonic corporatisation of the aesthetic of the shared urban landscape; although even anthropologists struggle with when someone first found beauty in the simplistic brilliance of paint on a wall

Street Art to Street Mess


The Czech Republic is a perfect example of a place where street art has become street mess in the eyes of law enforcers and public opinion.


Street art in the Czech Republic peaked in the 1980s. At this time municipal authorities were leaner in punishments, young Czechs first started listening to hip-hop, and Prague was considered amongst the best cities in the world for graffiti. Today, the Czech Republic is still awash with colour. This takes the form primarily of tags, but there are also some stunning pieces around by the likes of Eugene, Zlo and Piano33. But with the municipal crackdown, graffiti is now an altogether riskier enterprise. Jaroslava Hrabálková, the fifty two year old “sprayer doyenne” from Brno, who was recently imprisoned, would testify to this. And whilst graffiti is continuously outlawed, corporate billboards will continue to pop up everywhere. Prague’s historic centre will continue to be plastered over by hundreds of new billboards over the next decade, cementing advertising’s position as the primary urban aesthetic.

And so the space graffiti occupies in the public mindset is contradictory: people want to live in attractive places, yet most see street art as a sign of degradation, not creativity. People want to feel control within the place they live, yet nobody protests when another billboard is erected. And this contradiction can be extended to Banksy. His works are the anti-war, anti-corporate billboards of our shared urban spaces, yet the “Banksy Brand” thrives on the publicity of his stunts in the mainstream media, which he claims to detest. To some he is a subversive vandal, to others a mysterious genius. But to most he is just an artist that fills the drab architecture of our cities with funny, thought provoking visions.





Comentarios

Actualmente no hay comentarios

Agregar nuevo comentario

Artículos recomendados

Le Dernier Cri and the black penis of Marseille Le Dernier Cri and the black penis of Marseille
We’re constantly hearing that someone would like to do some joint project, organize something together, some event, but… damn, how to put it... we really like what you’re doing but it might piss someone off back home. Sure, it’s true that every now and then someone gets kicked out of this institution or that institute for organizing something with Divus, but weren’t they actually terribly self…
Acts, Misdemeanors and the Thoughts of the Persian King Medimon Acts, Misdemeanors and the Thoughts of the Persian King Medimon
There is nothing that has not already been done in culture, squeezed or pulled inside out, blown to dust. Classical culture today is made by scum. Those working in the fine arts who make paintings are called artists. Otherwise in the backwaters and marshlands the rest of the artists are lost in search of new and ever surprising methods. They must be earthbound, casual, political, managerial,…
Nick Land – An Experiment in Inhumanism Nick Land – An Experiment in Inhumanism
Nick Land was a British philosopher but is no longer, though he is not dead. The almost neurotic fervor with which he scratched at the scars of reality has seduced more than a few promising academics onto the path of art that offends in its originality. The texts that he has left behind are reliably revolting and boring, and impel us to castrate their categorization as “mere” literature.
Contents 2016/1 Contents 2016/1
Contents of the new issue.
ArtLeaks
27.07.2014 19:39
¿A dónde ir ahora?
fuera
S.d.Ch, Solitarios y Cultura Periférica   (una generación nacida alrededor de 1970)
S.d.Ch, Solitarios y Cultura Periférica (una generación nacida alrededor de 1970)
Josef Jindrák
¿Quién es S.d.Ch? Una persona de muchos intereses –activa en varios campos- la literatura, el teatro, conocida por sus cómics y sus collages en los campos del arte. Un poeta y dramaturgo principalmente. Un solitario por naturaleza y determinación, su trabajo no se encajona en las corrientes actuales. Siempre antepone la enunciación personal, incluso cuando su estructura interna puede volverse…
Leer más...
fuera
Revista THC: Revisitando el Condenado Pasado
Revista THC: Revisitando el Condenado Pasado
Ivan Mečl
¡Somos el quinto partido político global! Pítr Dragota ys Viki Shock, Fragmenty geniality / Fragmentos de carisma, mayo y junio de 1997. Cuando Viki llegó de visita, fue solamente para mostrarme algunos dibujos y collages. Sólo como un pensamiento tardío me mostró la publicación checa de finales de los noventa, THC Review. Cuando vio cuánto me fascinaba, le entró el pánico e insistió que…
Leer más...
prize
To hen kai pán (Jindřich Chalupecký Prize Laureate 1998 Jiří Černický)
To hen kai pán (Jindřich Chalupecký Prize Laureate 1998 Jiří Černický)
Leer más...
Dolores de parto
¿A quién le asusta la maternidad?
¿A quién le asusta la maternidad?
Zuzana Štefková
La pluralización de las definiciones de “madre“ es, a un tiempo, un lugar de represión recrudecida y de liberación potencial. (1) Carol Stabile Corría el año 2003 y una mujer en avanzado estado de embarazo estaba de pie al borde del camino en el matorral del bosque Lapák de Kladno. En el marco de la exposición Artistas en el bosque, los transeúntes podían vislumbrar el destello de su vientre…
Leer más...
Libros, video, ediciones y obras de arte que podrían interesarle Ir a la tienda virtual
Strong, 2002, acrylic painting on canvas, 24 x 20,5, on frame
Más información...
900 EUR
2005, 30.5 x 23 cm (4 Pages), Pen & Ink Comic
Más información...
894 EUR
Astronaut, sketch - inkwash, 2011, 33 x 25 cm
Más información...
460 EUR
22 x 31 x 1 cm / 32 pages / sérigraphie 5 pass. couleur / 200 ex || Gravures de Rémi Pierlo, Adolpho Avril, Benoit Montjoie...
Más información...
30 EUR

Studio

Divus and its services

Studio Divus designs and develops your ideas for projects, presentations or entire PR packages using all sorts of visual means and media. We offer our clients complete solutions as well as all the individual steps along the way. In our work we bring together the most up-to-date and classic technologies, enabling us to produce a wide range of products. But we do more than just prints and digital projects, ad materials, posters, catalogues, books, the production of screen and space presentations in interiors or exteriors, digital work and image publication on the internet; we also produce digital films—including the editing, sound and 3-D effects—and we use this technology for web pages and for company presentations. We specialize in ...
 

Cita del día El editor no se responsabiliza por los estados físicos o mentales que puedan generarse después de leer la cita

Enlightenment is always late.
Contacto e información del visitante Contactos de la redacción

DIVUS NOVA PERLA
Kyjov 36-37, 407 47 Krásná Lípa
Czech Republic

Gallery, Bookshop and Cafe
open from Wednesday to Sunday
between 11am to 10pm

and on appointment
at shop@divus.cz, +420 606 606 425

 

Divus Perla
Gábina Náhlíková, gabina@divus.cz, +420 604 254 994


Divus Publishing
Ivan Mečl, ivan@divus.cz, +420 602 269 888

 

Design, Pre-Press and Printing Studio Divus
studio@divus.cz

 

Magazine Umělec
Palo Fabuš, umelec@divus.cz

 

Cafe, Bookshop & Library
Hana Turynová, shop@divus.cz, +420 606 606 425

DIVUS LONDON
Arch 8, Resolution Way, Deptford
London SE8 4NT, United Kingdom

news@divus.org.uk, +44 (0) 7526 902 082

 

DIVUS BERLIN
berlin@divus.cz


DIVUS WIEN
wien@divus.cz


DIVUS MEXICO CITY
mexico@divus.cz


DIVUS BARCELONA
barcelona@divus.cz

DIVUS MOSCOW & MINSK
alena@divus.cz

SUSCRIPCIÓN AL NEWSLETTER DE DIVUS
Divus We Are Rising National Gallery For You! Go to Kyjov by Krásná Lípa no.37.