Umělec 2012/1 >> State of the Union/The Last Word Просмотр всех номеров
State of the Union/The Last Word
Журнал Umělec
Год 2012, 1
6,50 EUR
Послать печатную версию номера:
Получить подписку

State of the Union/The Last Word

Umělec 2012/1

20.05.2013 14:53

Tony Ozuna | america | en cs de

Censorship could be defined as something that happens everywhere in the world, but not in America. There thus remains the need to explain those strange phenomena that readers of American newspapers sometimes encounter. We will ask Europeans; perhaps they will recognize something ancient in them.

In a recent The New Yorker issue (March 12, 2012), art critic Peter Schjeldahl revives a topic that has plagued me throughout this “American” issue of Umělec. Schjeldahl reviews the 2012 edition of the Whitney Biennial, but begins by referring back to what apparently in the opinion of most New Yorkers was the “worst ever” Whitney Biennial.

NYC’s most revered Biennial was instituted in 1932. The 1993 show stands out to Schjeldahl, writing that “the notorious political-identity-mongering edition of 1993, which, come to think of it, really may have been the worst ever, producing a memorable spike in the fever chart of the art culture. (Buttons were handed out that read ‘I can’t imagine ever wanting to be white.’)” Then Schjeldahl segues into the most recent Biennial, which he loves. He calls it “enchanting.” “This year’s Biennial enchants—albeit darkly, in some cases,” he writes.

Later he also points out that this year’s Biennial happens to have the same organizer (Elisabeth Sussman), “who, incidentally, curated the 1993 succes de scandale….” By the end of the review, Schjeldahl admits that this one (2012) may as well be “the best Whitney ever.” In other words, Elisabeth Sussman has finally grown up—she’s lightened up. No one is confused or even potentially offended. Mission successful.

What interests me most here, however, and even disappoints me, is that The New Yorker goes out of its way not to name the artist responsible for the “scandalous” buttons. To not name the artist, intentionally—to make the artist a no-name, invisible, as if he/she were persona non grata, to be unworthy of mention (by name) in The New Yorker, for once snubbing the art establishment, is a low blow, a cheap shot.

It is not censorship, because of course Americans do not do that. Americans instead monitor regimes that are censoring, and make these reports widely available. But to be dismissed or ignored or not named with spite is an insidious insult—probably just as satisfying as the glee that censors must feel in their little realms of power.

I know the artist who Schjeldahl refuses to mention, and I can say that the works of our unnamed artist are anything but “enchanting” in the thirty years of his/her oeuvre. Absolutely nothing could be called “enchanting.” And this is all I will write here to describe this artist because in my previous attempt to describe this artist’s work for the American issue of Umelec, first through an interview, then an essay, proved to be unacceptable.

As far as I am concerned, this issue is dedicated to the unnamed artist—the one who did not make the cut, though the cut could have been the deepest. “I am an artist that lives in Los Angeles, seems more than sufficient,” is how he referred to himself in our interview, instead of saying he’s “American.”






Комментарии

Статья не была прокомментирована

Добавить новый комментарий

Рекомендуемые статьи

Tunelling Culture II Tunelling Culture II
The Top 10 Czech Artists from the 1990s The Top 10 Czech Artists from the 1990s
The editors of Umělec have decided to come up with a list of ten artists who, in our opinion, were of crucial importance for the Czech art scene in the 1990s. After long debate and the setting of criteria, we arrived at a list of names we consider significant for the local context, for the presentation of Czech art outside the country and especially for the future of art. Our criteria did not…
No Future For Censorship No Future For Censorship
Author dreaming of a future without censorship we have never got rid of. It seems, that people don‘t care while it grows stronger again.
Nick Land – An Experiment in Inhumanism Nick Land – An Experiment in Inhumanism
Nick Land was a British philosopher but is no longer, though he is not dead. The almost neurotic fervor with which he scratched at the scars of reality has seduced more than a few promising academics onto the path of art that offends in its originality. The texts that he has left behind are reliably revolting and boring, and impel us to castrate their categorization as “mere” literature.
ArtLeaks
27.07.2014 19:39
Следующий шаг?
out - archeology
S.d.Ch, Solitaires and Periphery Culture (a generation born around 1970)
S.d.Ch, Solitaires and Periphery Culture (a generation born around 1970)
Josef Jindrák
Who is S.d.Ch? A person of many interests, active in various fields—literature, theater—known for his comics and collages in the art field. A poet and playwright foremost. A loner by nature and determination, his work doesn’t meet the current trends. He always puts forth personal enunciation, although its inner structure can get very complicated. It’s pleasant that he is a normal person and a…
Читать дальше...
out - poetry
THC Review and the Condemned Past
THC Review and the Condemned Past
Ivan Mečl
We are the fifth global party! Pítr Dragota and Viki Shock, Fragmenty geniality / Fragments of Charisma, May and June 1997. When Viki came to visit, it was only to show me some drawings and collages. It was only as an afterthought that he showed me the Czech samizdat publication from the late 1990s, THC Review. When he saw how it fascinated me, he panicked and insisted that THAT creation is…
Читать дальше...
prize
To hen kai pán (Jindřich Chalupecký Prize Laureate 1998 Jiří Černický)
To hen kai pán (Jindřich Chalupecký Prize Laureate 1998 Jiří Černický)
Читать дальше...
birthing pains
Who’s Afraid of Motherhood?
Who’s Afraid of Motherhood?
Zuzana Štefková
Expanding the definition of “mother” is also a space for reducing pressure and for potential liberation.1 Carol Stabile The year was 2003, and in the deep forests of Lapák in the Kladno area, a woman in the later phase of pregnancy stopped along the path. As part of the “Artists in the Woods” exhibit, passers-by could catch a glimpse of her round belly, which she exposed especially for them in…
Читать дальше...
Knihy, multimédia a umělecká díla, která by vás mohla zajímat Войти в e-shop
Nevíte jak volit? Jste vyděšeni chmurnými průzkumy, ztraceni ve volebních slibech a zmateni mnohoznačnými analýzami expertů?...
Больше информации...
3,80 EUR
American Issue
Больше информации...
6,50 EUR
Back to Roots Issue
Больше информации...
6,50 EUR

Studio

Divus and its services

Studio Divus designs and develops your ideas for projects, presentations or entire PR packages using all sorts of visual means and media. We offer our clients complete solutions as well as all the individual steps along the way. In our work we bring together the most up-to-date and classic technologies, enabling us to produce a wide range of products. But we do more than just prints and digital projects, ad materials, posters, catalogues, books, the production of screen and space presentations in interiors or exteriors, digital work and image publication on the internet; we also produce digital films—including the editing, sound and 3-D effects—and we use this technology for web pages and for company presentations. We specialize in ...
 

Цитата дня Издатель не несет ответственности за какие-либо психические и физические состояния и расстройства, которые могут возникнуть по прочтении цитаты.

Enlightenment is always late.
KONTAKTY A INFORMACE PRO NÁVŠTĚVNÍKY Celé kontakty redakce

DIVUS LONDON 
Arch 8, Resolution Way, Deptford
London SE8 4NT, United Kingdom

Open Wednesday to Saturday 12 - 6 pm

 

Office: +44 (0) 20 8692 5157
 

Ivan Mečl
ivan@divus.org.uk, +44 (0) 7526 902 082

 

Shop
shop@divus.org.uk, +44 (0) 20 8692 5157

DIVUS PERLA
Former papermill area, Nádražní 101
252 46 Vrané nad Vltavou, Czech Republic
ivan@divus.cz, +420 602 269 888

Open from Wednesday to Sunday between 11am to 6pm.
From 15.12. to 15.1. only on appointment.

 

DIVUS BERLIN
at ZWITSCHERMASCHINE
Potsdamer Str. 161, 10783 Berlin, Germany

berlin@divus.cz, +49 (0) 1512 9088 150
Open Wednesday to Saturday 2 - 7 pm

 

DIVUS WIEN
wien@divus.cz
DIVUS MEXICO CITY
mexico@divus.cz
DIVUS BARCELONA
barcelona@divus.cz
DIVUS MOSCOW & MINSK
alena@divus.cz

NOVINY Z DIVUSU DO MAILU
Divus New book by I.M.Jirous in English at our online bookshop.